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How do I get a Marriage License in Queensland?

Updated: May 18


marriage license queensland, notice of intended marriage

My first question is, why do you think you need one? We all grew up (even me all those eons ago) watching America film and television. You need a marriage license in the U.S. but not here.


In America every state is different. Different notice periods between when you get the license and when you can marry. Different hoops you have to jump through; like where you go to get one and what criteria you must meet.


Let’s look into it and see just how bloody easy it is to get married in Queensland (or anywhere in Aus for that matter).


What do we have instead of a Marriage License in Queensland?


In Australia we have commonwealth Registered Celebrants who are trained and examined in all the legal aspects of Marriage in Australia and are given the authority to approve a couple to marry without having to go to any Government department.


We act for the Government. Anywhere in Australia.


So you don’t have to make an appointment at the courthouse or registry office and shlep it into the city with all your official paperwork. You don’t have to take time off work to do it during business hours. You don’t have to find a baby sitter because most of us will come to you.


Governments don’t issue marriage licenses in Queensland which you then take away and give to a civil celebrant, and then register yourselves (going back to the office) later. Your celebrant does it all.


The first step in the process is to lodge your Notice of Intended Marriage.


queensland-marriage-license, notice-of-intended-marriage

Ok, then what is a Notice of Intended Marriage?


A Notice of Intended Marriage has 5 pages.


The first two are instructions on how to complete the form and the (pretty long) privacy statement. There’s a part of the form that says when you sign it you acknowledge that privacy statement.



I’m more than happy to wait while you read it, and I leave a copy of it with you.


The next page is for your details.


Your name

Your date and place of birth

Your usual address

Your occupation

Your marital status

Your parents’ names and country of birth


Page 4 is where you sign and where your celebrant records the details of the ID documents you must show them.


Proof of date and place of birth (passport or birth certificate)

Photo ID (passport, license or proof of age card)

Proof of divorce or widowhood (divorce certificate or death certificate of previous spouse).


And the last page the celebrant fills out after the marriage.



queensland-marriage-license, notice-of-intended-marriage

How do I lodge my Notice of Intended Marriage?


By “lodge” we mean fill it out (with your celebrant’s help) show them your ID, sign and date it. They sign and date and take it away with them. It’s lodged. It’s lodged WITH your celebrant in their official capacity. Too easy.


You MUST lodge your notice of intended marriage by giving it to your celebrant (in hard copy or electronically) a MINIMUM of 1 calendar month prior to your wedding.


However, your signatures on the Notice of Intended Marriage don’t have to be witnessed by a celebrant if you can’t get to them in time. Those information pages give you a list of who can witness your signatures. You don’t have to show those witnesses ID, they are only verifying that you have signed.


The celebrant doesn’t have to sight that ID to accept the Notice but they do have to see originals of that ID at some time prior to the ceremony and they will need the original Notice of Intended Marriage if you have lodged it with them electronically.


If you would like to have a look at the Notice of Intended Marriage (which we celebs call the NOIM – there’s jargon in every profession) click to download the PDF – There's also a download to talk you through a few FAQ’s (not covered by the official instructions) if you want to fill one in yourself and send it through.

Guide to the NOIM
.pdf
Download PDF • 203KB
2021 NOIM
.PDF
Download PDF • 904KB





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